Decorated vs. Undecorated Canteens

Peoples across the Southwest developed unique design approaches to decorating pottery.  Not surprisingly, there are a number of motifs related to water that are shared by many different groups.  Among these are waves, tadpoles, dragonflies, and frogs.  Hopis, after around 1880 applied katsina figures, especially Palhikwmana (Water Drinking Maiden). 

Wepo Plain miniature canteen, ca. 1890, Hopi Mesas, AZ. Unknown artist. Dr. Joshua A. Miller Collection, gift of the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society, 1917. Max. length: 6 in. (15 cm.). (Catalog No. 18209)

 

Walpi Orange ware canteen, ca. 1890, Hopi Mesas, AZ. Unknown artist. Dr. Joshua A. Miller Collection, gift of the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society, 1917. Max. length: 11.5 in. (29 cm.). (Catalog No. 18206)

 

Zuni Polychrome canteen with rosette design. ca. Late 1800s, Zuni, NM. Unknown artist. Gila Pueblo Collection, received 1951. Max. length: 12.4. in.. (31.4 cm.). (Catalog No. GP-17520)

 

Black-on-orange canteen with frog and dragonfly motifs, ca. Late 1800s, Hopi Mesas, AZ or Zuni, NM. Unknown artist. Gift of Burton Swope, 2003. Max. length: 5.1 in. (12.9 cm.). (Catalog No. 2008-1224-1)

 

Zuni Polychrome canteen, ca. 1880, Zuni, NM. Unknown artist. Collected by Byron Cummings at Zuni Pueblo, 1920. Max. length: 14.2 in. (36.4 cm.). (Catalog No. 12197)

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